How To Care For Your Cast

Keep your cast DRY! 

  • Moisture can weaken the cast and dampen the padding which can lead to skin irritation. 
  • When showering, keep the cast covered with commercially available cast guards or two layers of plastic bags to protect against the water. 
  • Even when covered, it cannot be submerged in water or held under running water. 
  • If the cast gets moist at the edge, you may use a hair dryer on the cool setting to dry off the cast. 

 

Keep your cast CLEAN!   

  • If you would like to get it signed, you can do so with a Sharpie marker. 
  • Avoid placing powder or creams inside the cast as these can cause moisture to build up and result in skin irritation.   

 

How to keep your cast COMFORTABLE!

  • Elevate your extremity above the level of your heart.  This will help to reduce swelling that can occur as a result of your injury. This will be especially helpful in the first 48-72 hours as your cast may feel a bit snug initially.  
  • You may place ice on the cast in a dry plastic bag. 
  • Move your fingers and toes regularly to keep the blood flowing and maintain range of motion.  
  • Do not remove the padding from underneath the fiberglass.  This can leave sharp edges which can irritate the skin. 
  • Do not place anything inside the cast to scratch.  This can cause things to get trapped inside the cast or cause skin breakdown inside the cast which can lead to infection. Talk to your doctor about taking an over the counter antihistamine medication if you develop itching in the cast.  
  • Do not trim your cast or attempt to cut it off.  This can lead to serious bodily harm. 

  

Call the office immediately if the following things occur while in the cast: 

  • Increased pain or feeling that the cast is becoming too tight 
  • If the cast becomes wet
  • New numbness or tingling in your hand or foot 
  • Excessive swelling of your fingers or toes where the cast stops 
  • Redness of the skin at or near the cast 
  • Foul smelling odor or drainage from the cast 
  • Loss of ability to move your fingers or toes 
  • Fever 

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