Wrist, PRC, and Four Corner Fusion

A partial wrist fusion involves fusing the radoiocarpal joints that have been most affected by arthritis, while a total wrist fusion involves fusing the whole radoiocarpal joint.

Total or Partial Wrist Fusion

A partial wrist fusion involves fusing the radiocarpal joints that have been most affected by arthritis, while a total wrist fusion involves fusing the whole radiocarpal joint. This may be done with screws, plates or staples. In this case, the patient will be sacrificing wrist motion for pain relief. Recovery will involve immobilization for about six weeks while the fusion heals.

Total or Partial Wrist Fusion​ Modern Orthopaedics of New Jersey, Wayne, Parsippany, Dr. Peter DeNoble MD and Dr. David Ratliff MD. Orthopedic Surgeons, Hand Surgeon
Total or Partial Wrist Fusion​ Modern Orthopaedics of New Jersey, Wayne, Parsippany, Dr. Peter DeNoble MD and Dr. David Ratliff MD. Orthopedic Surgeons, Hand Surgeon

Four Corner Fusion

A four corner fusion is one technique in which midcarpal arthritis can be addressed surgically. This procedure involves removing the scaphoid bone and fusing together four of the remaining carpal bones. This is usually reserved for patients with a well preserved radiolunate joint and isolated midcarpal arthritis. The capitate, lunate, hamate and triquetrum are fused together with screws or large metal staples. This eliminates motion between these bones but preserves some motion at the wrist. These bones will fuse together into one bone with no joint space over time. The goal of this surgery is to eliminate pain caused by midcarpal arthritis and allow the patient to return to having a functional pain free hand and wrist.

Four Corner Fusion​
Four Corner Fusion​ Modern Orthopaedics of New Jersey, Wayne, Parsippany, Dr. Peter DeNoble MD and Dr. David Ratliff MD. Orthopedic Surgeons, Hand Surgeon

Proximal Row Carpectomy

A proximal row carpectomy involves removing the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum bones. This may be used in patients with Kienbock’s disease (avascular necrosis of the lunate), scaphoid nonuion, SLAC (scaphoid lunate advanced collapse) or SNAC (scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse) wrist. It is usually not a good option for patients with advanced arthritic changes. The goal of the surgery is to remove the bones causing pain while allowing the patient to retain some motion. The recovery time is generally quicker following this procedure, because you do not need to wait for any bones to fuse or heal before returning to activities.

Proximal Row Carpectomy​ Modern Orthopaedics of New Jersey, Wayne, Parsippany, Dr. Peter DeNoble MD and Dr. David Ratliff MD. Orthopedic Surgeons, Hand Surgeon
DRUJ Instability/Arthritis, Ulnocarpal Impaction, DIP Pinning for Mallet Finger

Benefits

Our world-class orthopedic surgeons have years of experience treating wrist conditions. We believe that even the simplest problems should be evaluated by a specialist.

Personalized care

As our patient, you will have an in-depth consultation with one of our doctors. We will create an individualized treatment plan together, tailored to your problem and lifestyle. Our doctors prefer non-invasive treatments whenever possible, including physical therapy and/or injections. If your problem ultimately does require surgery, our doctors prefer the least invasive surgical techniques possible. Our goals are the same as yours: to get you back to living your best life, pain free. 

Get in touch

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